Introducing Consumerism and Globalization- Smart Board simulation activity.

Intro into Consumerism and Globalization- November 29th

Learning Objectives To understand how our lives and actions are intricately connected with people all around the globe Curricular Objectives:RW8.2

Assess the implications of personal consumer choices

Materials needed: A map for each student, smart board (with map), scripts for volunteers Adaptations:  

:Have countries already circled on map, get him to highlight over the lines when we discuss them as a class

Offer the computer for ____to respond to question.

Set up Garage band for ____to respond to leading question at end of lesson.

Procedure:

Guiding Question: How do our consumer choices keep up connected to the rest of the world?

  • Get class to write down the question in their social note books. Jot down a few ideas that you might have to answer this question.
  • Ask for Six volunteers.
  • Going to read a short paragraph. While I am reading try and think about how what I say might be connected to the rest of the world.
  • For example if I say “ I put on a t-shirt” you might say – from china
  • Seven volunteers are going to stand up loudly read their script.
  • When you read a country, pause and we are going to find it on the map.
  • Find countries on your own map.
  • Exit slip: Respond to the guiding question- how do our consumer choices keep us connected to the rest of the world? How might some of these connections be negative to other countries around the world?

Guided Scripts:

Script for Ms. Knowles:
I awoke this morning at 7:30 am to the ringing of my alarm clock. I walked across the warm rug in the hall to the bathroom. I had a shower, combed my hair, and got dressed – choosing my favorite T-shirt and jeans. 

My Mum was making coffee and sliced a banana over her bran cereal. I quickly made peanut butter on toast. After breakfast I grabbed my sweater and back pack and hurried outside. My friend’s Dad called us on his mobile ‘phone and offered to give us a lift to school. On the way we played our latest CD and also stopped for gas on the way. Before school started we played a bit of pick-up soccer and then headed in at the bell.

I awoke this morning at 7:30 am to the ringing of my alarm clock. 
Stop! You have encountered the global. Your clock is a product of a major Japanese corporation. It was made in China – soon to be one of the world’s most powerful economies. It was shipped from Brazil to Canada in a Greek-owned ship manufactured in Sweden, licensed in Liberia and staffed by a Portuguese crew.

I walked across my warm rug, … 
Stop! You are walking on the global. Your carpet was made in India in a carpet industry that largely uses bonded child labor — used because of their nimble fingers, keen eyesight and ability to sit in the same position for hours. In theory these children are working to pay off a loan made from the company to their parents, but in reality the children are more like slaves because the terms of the loan make it a debt that can never be repaid.

I had a shower, combed my hair, … 
Stop! You are applying the global. Your shower products are perhaps made by the Body Shop (headquarters in the United Kingdom) which opposes animal testing and tries to counteract the wasteful packaging and questionable ingredients in many of the soaps and other products produced by huge transnationals. 

 

and got dressed – choosing my favorite T-shirt and jeans. 
Stop! Again you are wearing the global. Your shirt started in the cotton plantations of El Salvador, Central America, where workers pull cotton for one to two dollars a day under the hot sun. They are exposed to pesticides that are often applied improperly, and they have no access to medical care. The cotton is then shipped to the U.S. and woven into long sheets of fabric. After this, the fabric is then shipped to Haiti where it is distributed to small sweatshops where women textile workers, paid by the number of shirts they produce, earn about three dollars daily. 



 

was making coffee and sliced a banana over her bran cereal. I quickly made pea

nut butter on toast. 
Stop! You are now eating the global. The peanuts came from Senegal, the coffee from Colombia, the sugar from the Dominican Republic, and the bananas from Honduras. You need to be careful eating the global. Plants have had many toxic pesticides applied and they are harvested by poor agricultural practices. The workers are paid very little of the price you finally paid at the market. You are trying to find fair trade food, but so far it is hard to get in your local stores.

After breakfast I grabbed my sweater and back pack and hurried outside. 
Stop! You are carrying the global. Your new sweater was bought at the Mountainous Equipment Store and is made out of old plastic pop bottles. A company undertook a study to determine the environmental cost of the clothing they were producing. They found that everything they made pollutes in some way. In searching for a better method they came across a company that takes old plastic pop bottles, cleans them, melts them down and extrudes fibers that can be spun into yarns. This process means that less plastic ends up in landfill sites.

My friend’s Dad called us on his mobile ‘phone. 
Stop! You are listening to the global. Cell ‘phones and many of the new technological devices we have in our lives need a key element (Coltan) in their manufacture which is mined in regions such as the Congo that are ruled by corrupt governments or rebel forces. These countries sell their natural resources to multinational corporations for large sums of money, and then use this money to purchase arms. In turn, they use these arms to gain or maintain control over resource-rich areas and the innocent people who live there.

 give us a lift to school … 
Stop! Now you are driving the global. The parts in the car come from at least twelve different countries. For example, the glass and the radio come from Canada, the cylinder head, carburetor, and headlights are made in Italy, the starter, alternator, and windshield washer pump in Japan, the battery and mirrors in Spain, and so on.

 on the way we played our latest CD … 
Stop! You are hearing the global. That CD is a new release of a world music compilation and you are more and more attracted to this new music. Two of the bands have been part of political protests against globalization and war. The CD itself, however, was produced in Bangkok, Thailand, in a factory where most of the workers are girls as young as nine years old who are paid a monthly salary of $43.

Countries Effected:

Japan

China

Indonesia

Liberia

Brazil

Sweden

Greece

Portugal

Sweden

India

United Kingdom

El Salvador

U.S

Haiti

Senegal

Colombia,

Dominican Republic

Haiti

Congo

Spain

Thailand

Mexico

 

One thought on “Introducing Consumerism and Globalization- Smart Board simulation activity.

  1. Awesome lesson Emily! I actually stumbled on to this off of Google. I’m going to integrate this into my unit this month. Thanks for sharing such a great idea! Hope everything is going great for you.

    -Matt

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